August 10, 2010

Rural Students Tackle on Cutting-Edge Science

Students and teachers from five rural Wisconsin high schools recently came together to gain knowledge and experience in the field of stem cells. Summer Science Camp, which is in its fourth year, aims at empowering students’ through hands-on activities to pursue academic achievement and consider careers in science. 

Students and teachers participating in this year’s Summer Science Camp are from: Kewaunee High School, Ladysmith High School, Blackhawk High School, Oshkosh North High School, and Mayville High School.  The four-day program, developed in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, aims to provide an enrichment experience in an advanced scientific discipline while establishing long-term relationships with high school science teachers.

In addition to science, students also got a taste of campus life. After listening to lectures and participating in labs led by top UW-Madison stem cell researchers, students took part in UW-themed evening activities, complete with a Babcock Hall Ice Cream Social, a visit from Bucky Badger, and  a ‘behind the scenes’ tour of the Kohl Center.

To learn more about this year’s Summer Science Camp, click here.

 Summer Science Camp was recently featured in the Oshkosh Northwestern. The article can be found here.

About Summer Science Camp

In 2007, our team worked with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction to develop a science camp to serve rural Wisconsin high school students. Due to the size of these smaller communities, many school districts can only provide limited programs for students interested in scientific disciplines and careers.

Summer Science Camp* was created in 2007 to offer opportunities for students from these rural Wisconsin schools. The camp brought together students and teachers from five Wisconsin school districts to learn about the cutting-edge topic of stem cell research through innovative laboratory activities and lectures from leading scientists on the UW–Madison campus.

The camp introduced students and teachers to scientific disciplines not available in their schools; established long-term relationships with high school science teachers in Wisconsin; and helped students develop confidence in their scientific skills and abilities.

The inaugural Summer Science Camp was a huge success, paving the way for the program to become an annual event. Each year, participating schools select four students and one teacher to attend the four day camp, which is filled with labs, lectures and activities led by many prominent stem cell researchers.  We hope that the camp will empower the students and encourage them to attend UW-Madison to pursue higher education and professional opportunities.

Read more about Summer Science Camp here.

Summer Science Camp was recently featured on the Wisconsin Public Television news magazine “In Wisconsin.” The segment can be viewed on the “In Wisconsin” website.

Is your school interested in applying to attend Summer Science Camp? Teachers and principals can nominate their school for the program. *

Please contact outreach@morgridgeinstitute.org for more information on how to nominate your school for Summer Science Camp.

*At this time, Summer Science Camp is only available to rural Wisconsin school districts. Schools are nominated by their principal or science teachers; individual students or parents cannot apply. There are currently no fee-based science camps available through the Morgridge Institute for Research.

Summer Science Camp participants pose with MOE staff before the program's closing reception
Summer Science Camp participants pose with MOE staff before the program's closing reception


Campers work on a review puzzle during a cytogenetics lab activity
Campers work on a review puzzle during a cytogenetics lab activity


 Amber Mael shows participants different types of cell differentiation during an introductory lab
Amber Mael shows participants different types of cell differentiation during an introductory lab


Robin Schroll explains cell counting during an introductory lab
Robin Schroll explains cell counting during an introductory lab